Eat Right During Winter

Feb 3, 2020

Eat Right To Fight Cold And Flu This Winter!

Check out three of Mangia’s favorite natural remedies to keep you up and running during the cold and flu season. 

  1. Ginger Shots
    Ginger has been considered a powerful superfood for more than 5,000 years, often used in ancient India and China as a remedy to all kinds of illnesses and ailments.
    When pulp or juice from the root is fresh, raw, and free from sugars and other additives, it can help to protect the respiratory system. It is known to kill rhinovirus, one of the causes of the common cold. Fresh ginger is also a naturally microbial antioxidant, giving it the power to help rid the body of toxins, free radicals, and unhealthy bacteria. If you already have the flu, fresh ginger can also reduce inflammation and easy body aches or muscle soreness. Grab a ginger shot at Mangia to stay happy and healthy this winter!
  2. Vitamin C
    As soon as you feel a cold coming on, one of the quickest ways to ease symptoms is to load up on Vitamin C. Most people think of oranges and other citrus as the best source of Vitamin C, but other fruits and vegetables like green chili peppers, guava, sweet yellow peppers, thyme, kale, papaya, and strawberries are also rich in this natural antioxidant. 

 

  1. Chicken Noodle Soup
    Chicken noodle soup has long been favored as a grandmotherly cure to cold and flu symptoms, but science has proven that the benefits of this well-loved comfort food are real. A hot bowl of chicken noodle soup contains a carnosine compound that gives the immune system a boost to fight against early signs of the flu. Added anti-inflammatory benefits can also soothe symptoms of upper respiratory infections, like sore throat and congestion. Mangia’s homemade chicken noodle soup is available every day, but we’ve included it as our recipe of the month for those freezing February days that are better for cozying up at home than venturing out into the cold.

 

RECIPE

Time: 1 hour

Serves: 6 people

Ingredients:

– 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
– 1 yellow onion, finely chopped
– 1 stalk celery, thinly sliced
– salt and pepper to taste
– 12 cups chicken stock
– 1 large or 2 small potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
– 1 large parsnip, peeled, halved, and chopped into small pieces

– 3 carrots, peeled and cut into thin rounds

– 1 package egg noodles (about 12 oz)

– 1 lb roasted chicken breast, shredded

– 1 cup snow peas or sweet garden peas

Steps:

  1. Heat the oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. Add onions and celery. Season with salt and pepper and cook until soft and translucent, about 8 to 10 minutes, stirring often to avoid browning. 
  2. Add chicken stock and bring to a boil. 
  3. Add potatoes and cook until tender but still a bit firm in the center, about 5 to 7 minutes.
  4. Add parsnip and carrots. Cook until tender, about 3 to 5 minutes. 
  5. Stir in egg noodles and cook until soft but still slightly chewy, about 9 minutes. 
  6. Lower heat to a simmer. Add shredded chicken breast, allowing it to be warmed through by the broth. 
  7. Stir in the peas and simmer for another 2 to 3 minutes (allow an extra minute or two for frozen peas). 
  8. Adjust salt and pepper to taste. Ladle into bowls and serve hot.


Did You Know That February Is American Heart Month?

This month, the American Heart Association encourages everyone to take a few simple steps to stay healthy and prevent heart disease. Regular exercise, stress management, and a healthy diet can all significantly decrease the risk of heart disease. Hit the gym with a friend, try yoga or meditation, and challenge yourself to cut back on added sugars, excess salt, and unhealthy fats. And remember to eat lots of heart-healthy foods, like fresh fruits and veggies, whole grains, almonds, and fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, like salmon.

 

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